Contents

Other Sponsors

Thistle Sports

Cricket Scotland

ACA 125 Handbook


Syndicate
XML feed

 

Umpiring

Umpiring

Please note that this section is for guidance only. Mr Ken Morrison of the Aberdeenshire Cricket Association and the Umpire on the selection committee of the ACA has been of great help in producing these guidelines. The ACA handbook and MCC Laws (see link below) are THE resources for the game.

If there are any players, without a game at the weekend or recently declared from playing, please contact Ken on 01467 632703.

A full set of the Laws of Cricket, from the M.C.C. can be found at: http://www.lords.org/laws-and-spirit/laws-of-cricket/

Taken from the site, with thanks and all references acknowledged:

The Preamble – The Spirit of Cricket

Cricket is a game that owes much of its unique appeal to the fact that it should be played not only within its Laws but also within the Spirit of the Game. Any action which is seen to abuse this spirit causes injury to the game itself. The major responsibility for ensuring the spirit of fair play rests with the captains.

1. There are two Laws which place the responsibility for the team's conduct firmly on the captain.

Responsibility of captains
The captains are responsible at all times for ensuring that play is conducted within the Spirit of the Game as well as within the Laws.

Player's conduct

In the event of a player failing to comply with instructions by an umpire, or criticising by word or action the decisions of an umpire, or showing dissent, or generally behaving in a manner which might bring the game into disrepute, the umpire concerned shall in the first place report the matter to the other umpire and to the player's captain, and instruct the latter to take action.

2. Fair and unfair play

According to the Laws the umpires are the sole judges of fair and unfair play.

The umpires may intervene at any time and it is the responsibility of the captain to take action where required.

3. The umpires are authorised to intervene in cases of:

  • Time wasting
  • Damaging the pitch
  • Dangerous or unfair bowling
  • Tampering with the ball
  • Any other action that they consider to be unfair

4. The Spirit of the Game involves RESPECT for:

  • Your opponents
  • Your own captain and team
  • The role of the umpires
  • The game's traditional values

5. It is against the Spirit of the Game:

  • To dispute an umpire's decision by word, action or gesture
  • To direct abusive language towards an opponent or umpire
  • To indulge in cheating or any sharp practice, for instance:
  1. to appeal knowing that the batsman is not out
  2. to advance towards an umpire in an aggressive manner when appealing
  3. to seek to distract an opponent either verbally or by harassment with persistent clapping or unnecessary noise under the guise of enthusiasm and motivation of one's own side

6. Violence

There is no place for any act of violence on the field of play.

7. Players

Captains and umpires together set the tone for the conduct of a cricket match. Every player is expected to make an important contribution to this.

 
In addition, and paraphrasing from the MCC website, here are some important observations about Umpires:

Fair and Unfair Play

  • It is the Umpires, and only the Umpires, who are the sole judges of fair and unfair play;
  • If there is an occurrence during the match not covered by the laws, the Umpires shall call a 'dead ball'.

Dangerous or Unfair Bowling

  1. A ball which, irrespective of pace and the risk of physical injury, pitches and passes above the head of the striker (standing upright at the crease) must be called a No Ball by the bowler's end umpire. Such deliveries are not considered dangerous or unfair in themselves, but they are included in consideration when determining if short-pitched fast bowling is being employed repeatedly.
  2. A fast short-pitched ball below head height may also be called a No Ball, but only if in the opinion of umpire by reason of its height, length, direction and repetition there is the risk of physical injury to the batsman, taking the skill of the batsman into account.
  3. A ball, other than slow delivery, passing above waist height (if the batsman were standing upright at the crease) without pitching shall be caller a no ball by the Umpire.
  4. A slow delivery which passes the batsman above shoulder height (if the batsman were standing upright at the crease) without pitching shall be called a no ball.

    The last two of these (i.e. "beamers") are considered dangerous and unfair and will attract immediate disciplinary action - caution, final warning and removal from the attack for the remainder of the innings. "Bouncers" only attract disciplinary action when the umpire has decided that short-pitched bowling, either above head level, or below that level and likely to cause physical injury, has become "dangerous and unfair", taking the skill of the batsman into account. . This is a decision for the bowler's end umpire, though the square leg umpire may wish to assist by giving a discrete signal

    For further details, see Law 42.6 (Fair and unfair play) and also the MCC's notes on law 42 (PDF). 

Umpires' Positions

The Umpires shall stand where they can best see the action on the pitch, and it is up to them where they choose to stand:

  • The Umpire at the bowler's end shall stand where it doesn't effect the bowler's run-up or the strikers view;
  • The Umpire at the striker's end can stand on the off-side if he wishes, as long as he informs the fielding Captain, Striker and other Umpire.

Bad Light and Poor Conditions:

  • The batsmen 'in the middle' can deputise for the Captain at the appropriate time;
  • If the Umpires agree that the light is bad or conditions are such that play cannot continue, they shall inform the players as such. However, both Captains need to agree to continue. To restart, both Captains need to agree as such;
  • If agreeing to continue, either Captain (or Depute) can appeal for the conditions. The Umpires can take this appeal into consideration ONLY if conditions have become worse;
  • The Umpires can suspend play of they feel that there is a danger to the fielding side or batting side sustaining injury because of the conditions.

Dead Ball

The ball becomes 'dead' when:

  • It is in the hands of the bowler or wicketkeeper;
  • A boundary is scored;
  • A batsman is dismissed;
  • If it becomes trapped between the bat and person of the striker or other items of the strikers clothing;
  • If it becomes lodged in the protective helmet of the fielding side;
  • The Umpire calls Over or Time.

Note that the ball ceases to be 'dead' when the bowler starts his run up, or, if the bowler has no run up, when his bowling action starts.

Umpire's Signals

The basic signals an umpire should signal during a games are shown below:

4 Runs

Signaled by waving arm from side to side finishing with arm across the chest.

When the ball becomes dead, the signal shall be shown to the scorers.

The Umpire shall wait until the signal has been acknowledged by the scorers.

6 Runs

Signaled by raising both arms above the umpire's head.

When the ball becomes dead, the signal shall be shown to the scorers.

The Umpire shall wait until the signal has been acknowledged by the scorers.

Bye

Signaled by raising one open hand above the Umpire's Head.

When the ball becomes dead, the signal shall be shown to the scorers.

The Umpire shall wait until the signal has been acknowledged by the scorers.

Leg Bye

Signaled by touching a raised knee with a hand.

When the ball becomes dead, the signal shall be shown to the scorers.

The Umpire shall wait until the signal has been acknowledged by the scorers.

Dead Ball

(Ball is in play. When the ball becomes 'dead', the signal shall be repeated for the scorers).

The Umpire shall wait until the signal has been acknowledged by the scorers.

Signaled by crossing and recrossing the wrists below knee level.

Wide

(Ball is in play. When the ball becomes 'dead', the signal shall be repeated for the scorers).

The Umpire shall wait until the signal has been acknowledged by the scorers.

Signaled by the Umpire by extending both arms horizontally.

Out

(Ball is in play. It is not repeated for the scorers)

Signaled by raising one hand, with a finger extended, above the head. If not out, the Umpire shall say so.

Short Run(s)

Signaled by touching and tapping the shoulder with the hand.

The Umpire shall wait until the signal has been acknowledged by the scorers.

No Ball

(Ball is in play. When the ball becomes 'dead', the signal shall be repeated for the scorers))

Signalled by extending one arm horizontally

MrPurple  Feb 16 2006 - 12:04am   
 
Important Info

ALL Correspondence for the ACA Grades is to be directed to acagradess@gmail.com (note 2 ss in acagradess@gmail.com) and NOT to Individuals on the ACA Committee.

Please Click here for Your Club Results/Player Registration/Stats etc. in CricketStat or can now be found on the Left hand side of this WEB page under Contents


Results Hotline 078607 13966
ONLY CUP MATCHES TO BE TEXTED TO THIS HOTLINE NUMBER (including Photo of Score Books or Photo emailed to acagradess@gmail.com). All Other results must be entered into CricketStats by 8.15pm on the day of the match concerned. The Format used should be "1st team batting total with overs, top two batsman, top two bowlers, 2nd team batting total with overs, top two batsman, top two bowlers"s


ACA Forum

Recent Gallery Additions

Around the Clubs

Powered By

Powered by Drupal

Powered by Coppermine

Powered by phpBB2

Monitored by pingability